Three Years and Counting

March 1st, 2011

3It's been a little over three years since we brought our youngest child, Maddie, home from Ukraine. It seems like just yesterday I stepped off that plane in Kansas City with the Madster and ran into my family's arms - exhausted from spending three weeks by myself in Ukraine, but amazed at the bond Maddie and I were slowly building. Over the last 1,096 days we've worked hard on that bond. We have spent a lot of time teaching her what family is...learning how to navigate through some post-orphanage stuff and helping her to adapt to the listening world. Today, I can honestly say...I am Maddie's mom. She believes it...and I KNOW it. Sure, she still would walk away with a stranger...but now she would… [more]

The Greatest Story in the World

January 26th, 2011
Posted By: on Ukraine Adoption

1145735_reading_books_at_homeI have done some research this morning and found that there is no change to the status of Ukraine at this time. It is still open for adoption applications. So, we have 'time on our hands.' I think that this would be a good opportunity to tell you about a dear family that is in my neighborhood. Neighborhood might be a stretch since I live in the middle of nowhere with no close neighbors....but we will call it that because  I can drive to their house in 10-15 minutes. That's close out here in ruralville. Anyway, this family went to (then Russia) but probably Ukraine and adopted two little girls. One was around eight, the other two...ish. Neither girl spoke any English. That was many… [more]

Ukraine…Open…?

January 12th, 2011
Posted By: on Ukraine Adoption

937195_-globe_in_hand-The country of Ukraine lies between the border countries of the Russian Federation and Moldova/Romania. It is a country that has been hit with great strife and economical hardships during its connection with and since its separation from the USSR. There are struggles for power and control that have resulted in mass poverty and depression. Alcoholism is a significant result of the depression that overshadows this country. According to a recent source, as many as twenty-five thousand children have entered orphanages in this country in the recent years. The need is incredible. Yet, need is not enough in some cases. As of November 2010, the Ukrainian government is trying to pass a moratorium [ to cease] "intercountry adoptions from countries without bilateral agreements… [more]

Change in Ukrainian Adoption Regulations

December 11th, 2008
Posted By: on Ukraine Adoption

Effective December 1, 2008 Resolution #905 went into effect in Ukraine. The Resolution, which was introduced to new regulation for adoptions and the protection of rights for adopted children, sets regulations which govern the registration of abandoned children at the local, regional and central levels. In addition to the changes made regarding registration of abandoned children, it also describes the process for both domestic and intercountry adoptions. For a more detail description of the changes, read below: The Ukrainian Adoption Homestudy Starting December 1, 2008 the adoption homestudy should include the following items: - Home Address - Living Conditions (# of bedrooms, living space and conditions for the adopted child) - Biographical Information of the adoptive parents, household members (all members residing in the home, including their relationship to the adoptive parents) as well as… [more]

Ukrainian orphan needs, history, and happenings

September 10th, 2007

An email from former Ukraine Adoption Blogger, Angela highlights the ongoing needs of the children in that country, and a fundraising project in the works now. The 85 boys of the Teterevka orphanage, almost all ill and disabled, are in urgent need of food, shoes, and more, and An Orphan's Bright Star is asking for donations. From the charity: Teretevka is home to 85 special needs boys aged 7 to 25 yrs. 60% of these boys are ill, and a large percentage are invalids. They have so many critical needs. These boys are so skinny it breaks my heart. We have started a food drive to help. We've calculated that 6 dollars per month per child will provide the basics in nourishment to Teretevka's children. They are also… [more]

Americans Hit Dossier Quota

July 2nd, 2007
Posted By: on Ukraine Adoption

Don't Panic If you are preparing a dossier or waiting to submit a dossier, please read the entire post. This blog is just information reframed. Nothing has changed on dossier submissions. As the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy states: DON'T PANIC Well this just blows rotten eggs. My hope for 2007 was that everyone who wanted to adopt, could adopt. I don't think this is going to happen. Ukraine controls the number of adoptions via a quota system. They will allow around 2,000 dossiers to be submitted for international adoption. And we are half way through 2007. It looks like Americans will max out their dossier quota. If things keeping going the same, we might hit the max in October. Or we might hit another shutdown in… [more]

Love Thursday – Food Bank

June 28th, 2007
Posted By: on Ukraine Adoption
Categories: At Home, Food

Plant a row for the hungry Natasha and I recently toured a food bank. I was amazed to find out that about 11% of the United States population are food insecure. I delighted in Natasha's very developmentally appropriate behavior during the tour. Natasha is now 10 years old and came home from the orphanage 6.5 years ago. Her longest lasting post-institutional behaviors centered around food. Natasha first had to learn to chew at 3.5 years of age. And then she needed to feel secure that food was always available. So I gave Natasha control over her food and water intake. She could eat on demand. "On demand eating" meant that Natasha ate 8 or 9 very… [more]

Warnings and Ethical Adoption

June 28th, 2007
Posted By: on Ukraine Adoption
Categories: Getting Started

Life On The Edge I started answering some of Jan's questions about ethical international adoptions yesterday. She wanted to know why families ignore warnings and take the risk of an unethical adoption? Yesterday I wrote about the sometimes useless and general warnings that adoptive parents receive from the US State Department and US Embassy in Kyiv. Today I want to flash back into past. I want to discuss how ethics played a role in my decision to adopt from Ukraine. When I started researching adopting 1999 I quickly discovered that there was too much information. So I used unbiased web sites (AKA they weren't trying to make money off me) and statistics to narrow down my choices. I used my… [more]

Answering Ethical Questions

June 27th, 2007
Posted By: on Ukraine Adoption
Categories: Adoption Process

Window I love Jan. She always asks the best questions. All of the questions are from Heeding Warnings - Important in International Adoptions? Jan wants to know if adoptive parents read the notices and warnings from the US State Department. Yes we do. We read them very closely. The State Department has 15 notices posted on Ukrainian adoption. This is the highest number of notices on the page. Families do read the warnings. However many more get their information directly from the US Embassy in Kyiv. Anyone can email kyivadoptions@state.gov and asked to added to their email list for adoption updates. These notices are about families who completed their adoptions and didn't turn in their post adoption reports (as… [more]

Ukrainian Adoptive Family Blogroll

June 26th, 2007
Posted By: on Ukraine Adoption

Ukraine Adoption Blogroll My favorite blogs from 1997 to 2005 are found here and include some single adoptive parent blogs. This blogroll will contain recent 2006 and 2007 Ukrainian adoption blogs. I will try to update it once a week (or more if I find interesting blogs). The date/time stamp on this blog will indicate when it was updated. If I add a link or a family's status changes, I will mark it with *NEW*. Post a comment below or email me at adoptukraineblog@adoptionmail.com if you have a blog and want it added to the list. I love Reece's Rainbow. I have known this charity's founder, Andrea Roberts, via email for some time. She features families who are adopting Down's… [more]